ELEPHANTS OF NEPAL

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WHY THEY NEED OUR HELP

Nepal has approximately 208 captive elephants throughout the country (and approximately 120 in the wild). These figures do not include zoos. 

Of the 208 captive elephants, 92 belong to the government. The rest are used in tourism.*


As we now know, the life of a tourism/trekking elephant is anything but fun. They are often worked long hours with no respite from the heat or cold. They lack proper veterinary care and are frequently chained for long hours. Female elephants are unable to care for their young, who are taken away at young ages and cruelly broken in violent training, to make them docile for riding and tourism. 

*Source Sapoviagens

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HARSH REALITIES OF LIFE FOR WORKING 
ELEPHANTS

It is estimated that 20% of all elephants in Nepal suffer from tuberculosis. They are often suffering from untreated wounds inflicted by bull hooks, burned and blistered feet, lack of nutrition or 

proper veterinary care.

As understanding of these gentle giants continues to expand and more people demand humane solutions, the problem of where to retire elephants grows more acute.

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ILLEGAL IMPORT AND FORCED BREEDING

Because breeding of captive elephants is expensive in Nepal, old, sick or diseased elephants are frequently imported illegally from India and used for trekking and tourism. 


Many tourists come to Nepal wanting to experience an elephant ride, which continues to support the breeding, harsh treatment and exploitation of the elephants in Nepal.